Here is The New York Times hawking for war in 2003!!!


But that's right where this page is. More discussion is the only road that will get the world to the right outcome -- concerted effort by a wide coalition of nations to force Saddam Hussein to give up his weapons of mass destruction. We need another debate. Another struggle to make this the United Nations' leadership moment.

Saddam Hussein, meanwhile, has been skillful at providing the pretense of progress to international inspectors without seriously cooperating. Iraq has drawn the United Nations into a game of find the handkerchief, in which the burden is on the inspectors to track down mobile laboratories or sniff out hidden weapons. All this puts an enormous weight on what Iraqi behavior Hans Blix, the chief U.N. inspector, chooses to stress -- whether he dwells on Iraqi resistance or points to areas of cooperation. In the United Nations, the equivalent of a C-minus for effort on a Blix report can be taken as an argument for peace, while a D-plus can be seen as a call to war. The inspectors should never be put in the position of deciding international foreign policy.

This week the Security Council should reaffirm Mr. Blix's order and tell Mr. Hussein he must get rid of his missiles immediately, or outside forces will do it for him, with the support of the international community. That clear message would resolve the most frustrating problem for those who want the United Nations to nail down its position as the arbiter of world crises -- how to get France and its supporters to define their own bottom line rather than simply criticizing Washington's.

... [i]t's not surprising that in the wake of Sept. 11, the president would want to make the world safer, and that one of his top priorities would be eliminating Iraq's ability to create biological, chemical and nuclear weapons. Of all the military powers in the world, Iraq is the one that has twice invaded its neighbors without provocation (note: A lie: Kuwait was stealing Iraqi Oil!)and that has used chemical weapons both on its military foes and some of its own restive people.
Power and Leadership; The Real Meaning of Iraq - New York Times