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Thread: Article: Exceptional Roman Statue Found in London

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Alexander Hamilton's Avatar
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    Smile Roman Thread

    Ancient skeletons excavated under the city of York in northern England have archaeologists wondering whether they've discovered a well-preserved cemetery full of fallen Roman gladiators. The first of the skeletons was discovered in 2003, and since then, more than 80 have been identified.
    The remains date between the 2nd and 3rd centuries, the period during which the Romans occupied northern England. The skeletons had been decapitated — and that was a key reason researchers thought they had been gladiators, says John Walker, chief executive of the York Archaeological Trust, which conducted the research.
    Two other clues that they could be gladiators: One arm is generally bigger than the other, and the bones overall are heftier than usual.
    "They were big men for the time — 5-foot-7, 5-foot-8 — two inches bigger than average. They were heavy guys — about 170, 175 pounds, which was big for them — and very muscular," Walker tells NPR's Melissa Block. "So then we had all these big sturdy guys, all of whom had been decapitated."
    Walker says a muscular person's bones will be different from those with a slight build.
    "A very slightly built person will have very smooth bones with no real ridges," Walker says. "Somebody who's very muscular, the bone is actually quite different — you get these ridges that develop on them."
    In addition, Walker says, some of the skeletons had been hit on the head with a hammer before being decapitated.
    "That has always been suspected as a thing that happens to some gladiators. They get hit on the head first to render them unconscious," Walker says.
    What's more, there is evidence of large animal teeth marks in some bones, suggesting lion or tiger bites.
    Now, some theories about these skeletons don't involve gladiators.
    For example, Walker says, these men might have been prisoners. But where that theory falls apart is the animal bites. "Normally we'd expect those kinds of executions to really be quite straightforward, quite clean, no exposure to animals or anything else," Walker says. "They're a military discipline thing, not a spectacle."
    There is other evidence that gladiators may have fought in northern England during the Roman Empire.
    "There is an arena we believe somewhere in York, but we haven't found it," Walker says. "What we do have is a couple of stone inscriptions from about a half-mile away that by the way they're phrased suggest possible gladiatorial links. We also have a drawing from a tomb; carved into the stonework of the tomb is a gladiator as well."
    On June 14, the researchers will launch a Web site with the basic evidence so the public can vote. The vote is a good way of introducing people to the problems of archaeology, Walker says.
    "All our statements are a balance of probabilities. The past always remains an unknown thing," Walker says. "But I like to think that after 40 years of digging holes, maybe my guess is slightly better than the average, but not a lot."

    A Graveyard For Roman Gladiators -- In England? : NPR

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Silver Stallion's Avatar
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    Default Roman fortress Caerleon gives up new treasures to archaeology students




    Archaeology students learning how to use mapping equipment have stumbled across the site of large Roman buildings on the banks of the river Usk in Wales, right by one of the best-known and most-studied Roman sites in Britain.
    The structures have yet to be excavated, but one is enormous, possibly a granary or warehouse – or a palatial riverside villa.
    The students located the previously unknown buildings as they were learning to use geophysical tools, which can reveal the outlines of buried structures, in fields by the Roman fortress at Caerleon – claimed by some romantics as King Arthur's Camelot. The area has been excavated and studied for two centuries.

    Roman fortress Caerleon gives up new treasures to archaeology students | Science | guardian.co.uk

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Silver Stallion's Avatar
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    Default Shipwreck site points to an ancient roman battle





    During the year 241 B.C., the play was set for the big game. The players were the relatively young and ascending Roman Republic and the old declining Carthage empire; the stake was high as well: domination around the Mediterranean sea, in a series of conflicts called the Punic Wars. The remains of an ancient sunken warship found confirms the a battlepoint where the Romans put the last nail in the Carthage coffin: the final decisive battle between the two major players of the period.
    “It was the classic battle between Carthage and Rome,” said archaeologist Jeffrey G. Royal of the RPM Nautical Foundation in Key West, Fla. “This particular naval battle was the ultimate, crushing defeat for the Carthaginians.”
    “The historical importance is enhanced by the fact that warships are extremely rare, and this finding gives important clues about how these ships were constructed.
    “There’s never been an ancient warship found — that’s the holy grail of maritime archaeology,” Royal told LiveScience. “The most we have are the rams and part of the bow structure. At this point you’ve got to begin to say, ‘We have for the first time archaeologically confirmed an ancient naval battle site,’” Royal said.

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    Default Chinese villagers 'descended from Roman soldiers'




    Tests found that the DNA of some villagers in Liqian, on the fringes of the Gobi Desert in north-western China, was 56 per cent Caucasian in origin.

    Many of the villagers have blue or green eyes, long noses and even fair hair, prompting speculation that they have European blood.

    A local man, Cai Junnian, is nicknamed by his friends and relatives Cai Luoma, or Cai the Roman, and is one of many villagers convinced that he is descended from the lost legion.
    Archeologists plan to conduct digs in the region, along the ancient Silk Route, to search for remains of forts or other structures built by the fabled army.
    "We hope to prove the legend by digging and discovering more evidence of China's early contacts with the Roman Empire," Yuan Honggeng, the head of a newly-established Italian Studies Centre at Lanzhou University in Gansu province, told the China Daily newspaper.
    The genetic tests have leant weight to the theory that Roman legionaries settled in the area in the first century BC after fleeing a disastrous battle.
    The clash took place in 53BC between an army led by Marcus Crassus, a Roman general, and a larger force of Parthians, from what is now Iran, bringing to an abrupt halt the Roman Empire's eastwards expansion.
    continued....

    Chinese villagers 'descended from Roman soldiers' - Telegraph

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    Post Unearthed, a stunning Roman super-highway built 1,900 years ago

    15ft-high road ran from London to Exeter
    It was a route once trod by legionnaires as they marched across a conquered land.

    But, eventually, the Romans left Britain and the magnificent highway they created was reclaimed by nature and seemingly lost for ever.

    Now, some 2,000 years after it was built, it has been uncovered in the depths of a forest in Dorset.
    And, remarkably, it shows no sign of the potholes that blight our modern roads.

    Constructed by the Roman invaders as part of a route from London (Londinium) to Exeter (Isca), the 85ft wide earthwork stands more than 15ft high and consists of a sweeping road with deep ditches at the side.

    It was so densely covered by trees, however, that although its existence was known about, it simply could not be found until now.

    One of the country’s first roads, it was uncovered when the Forestry Commission, acting on advice from English Heritage expert Peter Addison, cleared the Norway spruce fir trees in Puddletown Forest.

    Mr Addison said it was the biggest Roman road he had come across and that it was probably designed to make a statement. It is thought that it might have been built shortly after the Roman conquest in the first century and its scale would have been chosen to intimidate people living nearby.
    Read more here
    Motorway maximus: Unearthed, a stunning Roman super-highway built 1,900 years ago | Mail Online

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    Default Dug out of the Thames mud, a token Romans used to pay for their pleasure

    Dug out of the Thames mud, a token Romans used to pay for their pleasure


    • Amateur archaeologist unearthed coin with a metal detector by river at low tide
    • First time a Roman brothel token is found in Britain


    Read more: Dug out of the Thames mud, a token Romans used to pay for their pleasure | Mail Online

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Silver Stallion's Avatar
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    Default re: Roman Thread

    That is why they call it the world's oldest profession.
















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    Default re: Roman Thread

    This find would make Libertarians proud.

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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Hallaton helmet unveiled after nine-year restoration

    The helmet had to be rebuilt from hundreds of corroded pieces stuck in a block of earth

    What has been hailed as one of the most significant recent UK Iron Age finds is going on display after a nine-year conservation project.

    BBC News - Hallaton helmet unveiled after nine-year restoration

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Silver Stallion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered


    A recently discovered mysterious "winged" structure in England, which in the Roman period may have been used as a temple, presents a puzzle for archaeologists, who say the building has no known parallels.Built around 1,800 years ago, the structure was discovered in Norfolk, in eastern England, just to the south of the ancient town of Venta Icenorum. The structure has two wings radiating out from a rectangular room that in turn leads to a central room.
    "Generally speaking, [during] the Roman Empire people built within a fixed repertoire of architectural forms," said William Bowden, a professor at the University of Nottingham, who reported the find in the most recent edition of the Journal of Roman Archaeology. The investigation was carried out in conjunction with the Norfolk Archaeological and Historical Research Group.
    The winged shape of the building appears to be unique in the Roman Empire, with no other example known. "It's very unusual to find a building like this where you have no known parallels for it," Bowden told LiveScience. "What they were trying to achieve by using this design is really very difficult to say."
    Adding another layer to this mystery is the ancient history of Norfolk, where the structure was found.
    The local people in the area, who lived here before the Roman conquest, were known as the Iceni. It may have been their descendents who lived at the site and constructed the winged building.
    Iceni architecture was quite simple and, as Bowden explained, not as elaborate as this. On the other hand, their religion was intertwined with nature, something which may help explain the wind-blown location of the site. "Iceni gods, pre-Roman gods, tend to be associated with the natural sites: the springs, trees, sacred groves, this kind of thing," said Bowden.
    The history between the Iceni and the Romans is a violent one. In A.D. 43, when the Romans, under Emperor Claudius, invaded Britain, they encountered fierce resistance from them. After a failed revolt in A.D. 47 they became a client kingdom of the empire, with Prasutagus as their leader. When he died, around A.D. 60, the Romans tried to finish the subjugation, in brutal fashion.
    Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered - Yahoo! News
















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    Contributing Sr. Mod Alexander Hamilton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Stallion View Post
    Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered





    Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered - Yahoo! News

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    Contributing Member Robertvincent's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    The Villa Loupian: a Gallo-Roman estate in Languedoc

    The ancient Roman world saw the rise and expansion of large-scale, estate-based agriculture, and at the heart of this system lay a very special institution – the villa.


    A new website from France’s Ministry of Culture and Communication takes visitors inside the Villa Loupian, offering never-before-seen 3D reconstructions, a virtual tour of the estate as it changed through the centuries, and panoramic views of the superb polychrome mosaics from Late Antiquity that were uncovered.

    The Villa Loupian: a Gallo-Roman estate in Languedoc | Archaeology News from Past Horizons

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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Roman fertility eagle dug up



    A Roman symbol of fertility found near Selkirk, shaped like an eagle emerging from a flower with a berry in its mouth, highlights the discoveries made in Scotland in this year’s Treasure Trove Report.

    The talisman, excavated in 2010 by a local metal detectorist between Selkirk and Galashiels, is believed to have adorned a Roman wagon or chariot, and is the first relic of its kind to be found north of the border.

    Roman fertility eagle dug up - Local Headlines - Selkirk Weekend Advertiser

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    Contributing Member Robertvincent's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Silchester Iron Age finds reveal secrets of pre-Roman Britain

    A single olive stone unearthed at the ancient town of Silchester is among the extraordinary finds that are leading archaeologists to rewrite British history



    The tiny skeleton of a sacrificial dog is unearthed at the Silchester dig.


    By the gap in a hedge bordering the entrance off a muddy lane in Hampshire, the young diggers on one of the most fascinating archaeological sites in Britain have made a herb garden: four small square plots. The sudden blast of sunshine after months of heavy rain has brought everything into bloom, and there's a heady scent of curry plant and dill, marigold and mint.

    Silchester Iron Age finds reveal secrets of pre-Roman Britain | UK news | The Guardian

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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Great Archeological post Robert!

    Iconoclast
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Time and erosion has obviously covered up a much more active and advanced society in ancient England and Europe than liberal historians and anthropologist would like to admit, much less reveal. But the facts can't be held in check forever, and they speak for themselves. White genius and organization have been around a very long time.
    Iconoclast likes this.

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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    A Roman shipwreck in the ancient port of Antibes

    A team of archaeologists from Inrap have uncovered a Roman shipwreck in southern France, in what was once part of the bustling ancient port of Antibes.


    Ancient Antipolis

    Antibes was known as Antipolis, a Greek colony originally founded by the Phoenicians of Massalia. The date of its origin is uncertain, but situated on the coast of Provence, Antipolis occupied a privileged position on the sea routes linking Marseilles to the Italian coast and contained a natural harbour – Anse Saint-Roch – which protected shipping from prevailing winds.

    A Roman shipwreck in the ancient port of Antibes : Past Horizons Archaeology

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    Contributing Sr. Mod Iconoclast's Avatar
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    From the comments to the linked article:

    "founded by the Phoenicians of Massalia" ?!?!?!?!

    It's Phokaians, Greeks originally from Phokaia.

    How about someone writing these articles at least with a modicum of historical knowledge."

    Iconoclast
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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    Archaeology: Plovdiv wants to expand Roman Forum dig after several finds



    Archaeologists working on digs at the Roman Forum and Odeon sites in Bulgaria’s second city of Plovdiv have unearthed a number of interesting finds from various periods and the city now wants to expand excavations at the Forum site.

    The Forum site, near the current modern-era central Post Office, dates from the first to second centuries CE. Overall, it covers about 11 hectares, making it arguably the largest such Roman-era forum site in Bulgaria.

    Archaeology: Plovdiv wants to expand Roman Forum dig after several finds - The Sofia Globe

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    Default Re: Roman Thread

    ROME. THE FIRST METROPOLITAN CITY

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    A Future For White Children.

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